IETF: Year End Review 2021

In terms of potential impact on Internet Freedom, it’s been a banner year at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). QUIC (featuring the improved privacy and security of TLS1.3) reached Proposed Standard status, with implementations and rollouts from every major vendor on both server and client, and with multiple open source toolkit options for developers. Encrypted Client Hello for TLS1.3 gained traction via the DEfO project that, through pull requests, makes a huge privacy enhancement easily available to the major security library (OpenSSL) underpinning the Internet’s most important service engines (nginx, apache, lighttpd, haproxy on the server, even curl on the client). [Read More]

IETF112 - Meeting Update (November 2021)

The 112th meeting of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) took place November 8-12, 2021 - as a virtual event for the sixth time in succession due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Here’s a summary of the work I found important to the Internet Freedom community. Privacy Preserving Measurement While we often (rightly) focus on unwanted surveillance of targeted individuals by nation-states and other bad actors, the Internet’s surveillance economy presents a major threat to personal privacy and freedom for all users of the Internet, as Mozilla so aptly describes on this wiki page. [Read More]

The IETF and Internet Freedom

It seems useful to clarify the relationship between the near-term work of keeping the Internet open on a daily basis - work that dominates the efforts of the Internet Freedom community - and the long term work of the industry on crafting operational standards for the same network. Those involved in Internet Freedom are typically focused on the “problems of today”, creating solutions using existing technologies offering immediate effect. Often, it’s hard to tell if Internet standards are helping, hurting, or just in the way. [Read More]