Easy translation workflows and the risks of translating in the cloud

Crowdsourced translation has opened up software and websites to whole new languages, regions, and uses. Making translating easier has brought in more contributors, and deploying those languages requires less work. A number of providers now offer “live”, integrated translation, speeding up the process of delivering translated websites. On the surface, this looks like a big win. Unfortunately, the way such services have been implemented opens up a big can of worms. [Read More]

Onion Browser Release 2.6 Tutorial

In this tutorial we’re going to talk about the best practices to browse the web securely on iOS using Onion Browser Release 2.6 and the Tor network. Onion Browser for iOS is a free, open-source web browser app developed originally by Mike Tigas, with Release 2.6 as a collaboration with the Guardian Project. Onion Browser has Tor built-in and uses Tor to protect your web activity. You can also watch the Onion Browser Video Tutorial on YouTube. [Read More]

On the classification of tracking

This position paper tries to outline a framework for defining trackers in smart phones and lists mechanisms for identifying them. It hopes to serve as the foundation for the work done in the Tracking-the-Trackers project. In section 1 we start with an abstract analysis of levels of unwanted behaviour in the context of tracking. Next, in section 2, we focus on an attacker’s perspective, on anonymity and pseudonymity. This foundation allows us to define terms which are needed throughout the paper. [Read More]

The Promise and Hazards of COVID Contact Tracing Apps

There has been increasing interest in the possibilities of tracking people who are infected with Coronavirus using all of the various methods that smart phones provide. There is good reason: “contact tracing” has been a pillar of public health efforts for decades. It is an effective means to curtail the spread of infectious disease. At the same time, governments, companies, and organizations are acting fast to offer services to help end this current pandemic. [Read More]

Tracking the Trackers: using machine learning to aid ethical decisions

F-Droid is a free software community app store that has been working since 2010 to make all forms of tracking and advertising visible to users. It has become the trusted name for privacy in Android, and app developers who sell based on privacy make the extra effort to get their apps included in the F-Droid.org collection. These include Nextcloud, Tor Browser, TAZ.de, and Tutanota. Auditing apps for tracking is labor intensive and error prone, yet ever more in demand. [Read More]

NetCipher + Conscrypt for the best possible TLS

A new NetCipher library has recently been merged: netcipher-conscrypt. In the same vein as the other NetCipher libraries, netcipher-conscrypt wraps the Google Conscrypt library, which provides the latest TLS for any app that includes it. netcipher-conscrypt lets apps then disable old TLS versions like TLSv1.0 and TLSv1.1, as well as disable TLS Session Tickets. This is an alpha release because it only works on recent Android versions (8.1 or newer). The actual functionality works well, the hard part remains making sure that it is possible to inject netcipher-conscrypt as the TLS provider on all Android devices and versions. [Read More]

Orbot v16: a whole new look, and easier to use!

Orbot: Tor for Android has a new release (tag and changelog), with a major update to the user experience and interface. This is the 16th major release of Orbot, since it was launched in late 2009. The main screen of the app now looks quite different, with all the major features and functions exposed for easy access. We have also added a new onboarding setup wizard for first time users, that assists with configuring connections to the Tor network for users in places where Tor itself is blocked. [Read More]

Haven: Building the Most Secure Baby Monitor Ever?

About eight months ago, friends at the Freedom of the Press Foundation reached out to us, to see if we were interested in prototyping an idea they had been batting around. They knew that from projects like CameraV and ProofMode, that we knew how to tap into the sensors on smartphones to do interesting things. They also knew we could connect devices together using encrypted messaging and onion routing, through our work on ChatSecure and Tor (Orbot! [Read More]

No more “Root” features in Orbot… use Orfox & VPN instead!

Since I first announced the available of Orbot: Tor for Android about 8 years ago (wow!), myself and others have been working on various methods in which to make the capabilities of Tor available through the operating system. This post is to announce that as of the next, imminent release, Orbot v15.5, we will no longer be supporting the Root-required “Transproxy” method. This is due to many reasons. First, it turns out that allowing applications to get “root” access on your device seems like a good idea, it can also be seen as huge security hole. [Read More]

Tracking usage without tracking people

One thing that has become very clear over the past years is that there is a lot of value in data about people. Of course, the most well known examples these days are advertising and spy agencies, but tracking data is useful for many more things. For example, when trying to build software that is intuitive and easy to use, having real data about how people are using the software can make a massive difference when developers and designers are working on improving their software. [Read More]

New research report on the challenges developers face

The Guardian Project has been working with the F-Droid community to make it a secure, streamlined, and verifiable app distribution channel for high-risk environments. While doing this we have started to become more aware of the challenges and risks facing software developers who build software in closed and closing spaces around the world. There are a wealth of resources available on how to support and collaborate with high-risk users. [Read More]

Imagining the challenges of developers in repressive environments

The Guardian Project team spends a lot of time thinking about users. In our work we focus on easy-to-use applications for users in high-risk scenarios. Because of this we are very focused on security. In our current work with the FDroid community to make it a secure, streamlined, and verifiable app distribution channel for high-risk environments we have started to become more aware of the challenges and risks facing software developers who build software in high-risk environments. [Read More]

HOWTO: get all your Debian packages via Tor Onion Services

Following up on some privacy leaks that we looked into a while back, there are now official Debian Tor Onion Services for getting software packages and security updates, thanks to the Debian Sys Admin team. This is important for high risk use cases like TAILS covers, but also it is useful to make it more difficult to do some kinds of targeted attacks against high-security servers. The default Debian and Ubuntu package servers use plain HTTP with unencrypted connections. [Read More]

Building the most private app store

App stores can work well without any tracking at all Attackers are increasingly seeing app stores as a prime attack vector, whether it is aimed at the masses like XCodeGhost or very targeted like in FBI vs Apple. When we install software from an app store, we are placing a lot of trust in a lot of different parties involved in getting the source code from the original developer delivered to our device in a useful form. [Read More]

PanicKit: making your whole phone respond to a panic button

Our mobile devices do so many things for us, making it easy to communicate with people in all manners while giving us access to all sorts of information wherever we are. But in times of anxiety and panic, it is difficult to quickly use them. Will you be too shaky to type in your PIN or lock pattern? Will you have enough time to find your trusted contacts and send them a message? [Read More]

Building a trustworthy app store that respects privacy

One core piece of our approach is thinking about very high risk situations, like Ai Weiwei or Edward Snowden, then making the tools for operating under that pressure as easy to use as possible. That means that we might occasionally come across as a little paranoid. It is important to dive into the depths of what might be possible. That is an essential step in evaluating what the risks and defenses are, and how to prioritize them. [Read More]

Experimental app to improve privacy in location sharing

As part of the T2 Panic effort, I’ve recently been diving deep into the issues of sharing location. It is unfortunately looking really bad, with many services, including Google, frequently sharing location as plain text over the network. I’ve started to write up some of the issues on this blog. As part of this, I’ve put together an experimental Android app that aims to act as a privacy filter for all ways of sharing location. [Read More]

Sharing your location privately

Facebook location sharing embeds the location in every single message, providing a detailed log to the recipient, Facebook, and anyone Facebook shares that data with One handy feature that many smartphones give us is the ability to easily share our exact position with other people. You can see this feature in a lot of apps. Google Maps lets you click “Share” and send a URL via any method you have available. [Read More]

Automatic, private distribution of our test builds

One thing we are very lucky to have is a good community of people willing to test out unfinished builds of our software. That is a very valuable contribution to the process of developing usable, secure apps. So we want to make this process as easy as possible while keeping it as secure and private as possible. To that end, we have set up an FDroid repository of apps generated from the test builds that our build server generates automatically every time we publish new code. [Read More]

Keys, signatures, certificates, verifications, etc. What are all these for?

For the past two years, we have been thinking about how to make it easier for anyone to achieve private communications. One particular focus has been on the “security tokens” that are required to make private communications systems work. This research area is called internally Portable Shared Security Tokens aka PSST. All of the privacy tools that we are working on require “keys” and “signatures”, to use the language of cryptography, and these are the core of what “security tokens” are. [Read More]