NetCipher + Conscrypt for the best possible TLS

A new NetCipher library has recently been merged: netcipher-conscrypt. In the same vein as the other NetCipher libraries, netcipher-conscrypt wraps the Google Conscrypt library, which provides the latest TLS for any app that includes it. netcipher-conscrypt lets apps then disable old TLS versions like TLSv1.0 and TLSv1.1, as well as disable TLS Session Tickets. This is an alpha release because it only works on recent Android versions (8.1 or newer). The actual functionality works well, the hard part remains making sure that it is possible to inject netcipher-conscrypt as the TLS provider on all Android devices and versions. [Read More]

Tweaking HTTPS for Better Security

The HTTPS protocol is based on TLS and SSL, which are standard ways to negotiate encrypted connections. There is a lot of complexity in the protocols and lots of config options, but luckily most of the config options can be ignored since the defaults are fine. But there are some things worth tweaking to ensure that as many connections as possible are using reliable encryption ciphers while providing forward secrecy. A connection with forward secrecy provides protection to past transactions even if the server’s HTTPS private key/certificate is stolen or compromised. [Read More]

VoIP security architecture in brief

Voice over IP (VoIP) has been around for a long time. It’s ubiquitous in homes, data centers and carrier networks. Despite this ubiquity, security is rarely a priority. With the combination of a handful of important standard protocols, it is possible to make untappable end to end encryption for an established VoIP call. TLS is the security protocol between the signaling endpoints of the session. It’s the same technology that exists for SSL web sites; ecommerce, secure webmail, Tor and many others use TLS for security. [Read More]
ostel  ostn  sip  tls  voip  zrtp 

Proposal for Secure Connection Notification on Android

A major problem of mobile applications being increasingly used over web-based applications, is that there is no standard established for notifying the user of the state of security on the network connection. With a web browser, the evolution of the “lock” icon when an HTTPS connection is made, has been one that evolved originally out of Netscape’s first implementation, to an adhoc, defact industry-standard way of letting the user know if their connection is secure. [Read More]